Monday, February 21, 2011

Texas Tint Laws 2011

Texas Tint Laws 2011
In Texas Tint laws and State inspections laws differ from one another.
In the state of Texas Tint limit is around 25% or above. This means the darkest tint to have safely would be 25% light emission. 20% is  the legal limit but sometimes it is argued that 30% is the legal limit. This limit is for each vehicle on the road.

 Texas Laws
Section 547.613 of Texas transportation the Texas Transportation Code makes it a misdemeanor to operate a vehicle with an object or material attached to the windshield, rear, or side windows that obstructs or reduces the driver’s visibility.

Sun-screening devices can not be applied until following conditions are met.

1. Sun-screening devices must be applied above the AS-1 line.

2. Sun-screening devices may not be red, amber, or blue in color.

3. Sun-screening devices, when measured in combination with the original glass, must have a light transmittance value of 25% or more.

4. Sun-screening devices, when measured in combination with the original glass, must have a luminous reflectance value of 25% or less.

5. A clear (un-tinted) UV film is allowed anywhere on the front windshield without a medical exemption being required.


Thanks to Texas Department Of Public Safety and Solar Control Films  for useful information.

Tint Depot has all standards window films. We have all specification window tint. For more information about Texas Tint Laws and suitable window films in Texas contact today. Visit our website
http://www.tintdepot.com/ 

2 comments:

Mike said...

Great! Do you have Indiana tint laws!
http://tintwindow.blogspot.com/

Window Tint said...

Yes, the legal limit for the front side windows is 25% total light transmittance. I own a window tint shop and we use 30% on front windows, because after measured with the original glass it's about 27-28 percent. There are no limits on the back side windows and rear glass. The darkest film we carry is 5% so combined with glass is about 2-3 percent and this is legal in Texas.
Information from Texas DPS website http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/vi/Misc/faq/tint.htm

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